Nov. 21: World Hello Day! (And I Missed It!)

Hi Readers: Or rather, a belated HELLO! I am so sorry I totally missed alerting us all to World Hello Day on the 21st– a day when we are all exhorted to greet 10 different people. This reminds them and ourselves that most  people are pretty good, and that talking beats fighting. Also that everyone is better off when we are greeting each other, rather than, say, sneering or snorting or staring with ill-concealed suspicion. So why not make this long Thanksgiving weekend a Hello Weekend?

And yes, that means even saying a kindly hello to the folks you see across the turkey. — Lenore

13 Responses

  1. That’s awesome – so sad we missed it. Will have to try and do it today.

    I’d love to hear your take on this article…

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/rss/int/news/-/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-11821439

    As I am about to go outside and set up an art centre for my 2 year old with long paintbrushes.

  2. What a great holiday. Have to remember that one. Could make shopping at this time of year much more pleasant… although I usually avoid those crowds.

  3. Everyday in New Orleans is hello day, or at least how ya’ doin’ day! Everybody greets everybody here.

  4. Although I have limited means in getting around, I made the effort to say hello to as many people downtown as I could on Sunday. Greeted people numbers 11 and 12 were my brother taking my mom out to lunch.
    Saying hello to 10 people we meet is friendlier and a more positive outlook than being afraid of the friends one hasn’t met.

  5. Whenever I’m walking, and I see someone (anyone) looking at me in a friendly manner, I always say hi, strangers or not, or at least a smile with a nod. Ever since an elder woman (many years ago) told me that I just made her day by being polite and nice to her (I smiled and said hi to her, then let her get on the train before I did). That she didn’t see that much from “young” people anymore. I realized that a smile does go a long way. You never know who you can touch with a smile. You may even change their outlook on life and never know it. “Do unto others…”. 😉

  6. My girls haven’t really had a fair shake at that whole “don’t talk to strangers” mentality. After all, their mother talks to random folks all the time, and it usually pans out for all involved. I recently wrote a post about how going against the flow (actually TALKING to strangers) makes for the most fantastic vacations. It’s here: http://jenpb.blogspot.com/2010/10/how-to-have-great-vacation.html

  7. Thankfully I live in a community where it is ‘normal’ to smile and say ‘good morning’ or ‘good afternoon’ when you meet people on the street.

    We actually comment if someone *doesn’t* do it!

  8. There’s a special day for that? Huh…I do it everywhere I go.🙂

  9. This reminds me of something my grandpa told me many years ago. That there were certain places where you were expected to say “hello”, and other ones where it’s not necessary (remember that part in “Crocodile Dundee”, where he greets everyone he passes by in Manhattan’s rush hour?).
    The places I remember where it was compulsory, were the countryside (always and everyone), places you know you will share for a while (waiting rooms, elevators), and crossing someone on your way, that you have ostensibly not missed (like a path in the park, or a long hotel corridor).
    Man, he was truly a good-mannered gentleman… Miss you, Avi.

  10. Lola: I believe the underlying rule is related to population density. If you’re only passing a few people on your journey, your brain is able to cope with them and so you greet them. But above a certain number of people you get overwhelmed and have to shut them out to be able to cope.

    But more people speak to you if you have a dog.
    http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/berg/anthroz/2004/00000017/00000004/art00004

  11. I don’t know if the root cause is being Southern or our deep Irish roots and the implied gift of gab but we here in the South habitually greet total strangers regularly.

    I hope we never lose that aspect of Southern-ness.

    I love your blog, Lenore. Happy Thanksgiving.

  12. I struggle with this not because I think strangers are inherently dangerous, but because I’m introverted. It is nice to have a friendly smile and not back when I try very hard to make an effort when walking down the street in my neighbourhood to say hello to the other walkers.

  13. I’m living in Northern Italy, where people are notoriously cold and aloof (or so I had been told). So I decided to smile at every single person I passed by on the street with whom I made eye contact (it’s Europe, people actually walk on the streets, unilke the U.S.!). And guess what? Many smile back!

    The best part is that I’m introverted, so I’ve had to make an effort, but it’s paying off! Sure, not everyone smiles back at me, but I like to think that my smile is warming their hearts even a little bit, and perhaps, just perhaps, they’ll think about smiling at the next person they meet.

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