An After-school Provider Laments the Crazy Rules

Hi Folks! Here’s yet another look at some insanely overprotective, unproductive rules governing anything having to do with kids. This rant/lament comes from¬†Rick Rood, director of an on-site after-school child care program in the San Francisco Bay Area.¬† He has worked in the profession since 1990, and provides workshops and coaching for education professionals who work with school-age children.¬† He blogs at AfterschoolAnswers and is currently finishing his new book, ‚ÄúThe Three Secret Pillars of Behavior Guidance,” even while he and his wife are raising kids aged 5, 16, and 17. This note came in response to a post about a YMCA that wouldn’t let a mom bring her 3-year-old in to use the bathroom because this was against the rules. – L

Dear Free-Range Kids:¬†¬†I run an after-school¬†program, and if that parent had come to our center, I would’ve had to tell them the same exact thing.¬† Our organization (we’re a string of 16 centers run by a rec and park organization) has a policy that outsiders are not allowed to use our¬†restrooms.¬†Why not?

One simple reason — liability.¬†¬†The (very) sad fact is that the policy comes from our insurance company. I do my best to be a “Free-Range” director.¬† I don’t make these policies, and there are many rules and regulations with which I personally don’t agree. But it goes deeper than that.¬† Because of this “bubble-wrap” mentality, out-of-school-time staff have become more and more infected over the years with this insidious “worst-case scenario” type of thinking.

Some examples? Recently one of my teachers reported me to my boss for a Free-Range comment I had made.¬† One day, one of our children decided to sneak away from school and not come to the afterschool program.¬† This resourceful 8-year-old made it pretty much clear across our medium-sized town, heading to a friend’s house.¬† We followed our policies when he didn’t show up to our program: parents and police were called, and they tracked him down in pretty short order. After the dust had settled, I made a comment to one of our teachers (who I mistakenly figured held similar Free-Range ideas), saying that, while it was good that we found the boy, I was impressed with the boy’s resourcefulness and that maybe, as a culture, we shouldn’t call up visions of child molesters and abductors every time something doesn’t go as planned. The teacher went to my boss, and told her that he didn’t think I was very serious about protecting the children in our care.

Another policy: Kids can’t walk home on their own.¬† Again, liability.¬† How much could we be sued for if a kid breaks their leg or goes missing on the short walk home (we’re a neighborhood school), ¬†even if the parent has given permission?¬† Frustrating to me because the odds that nothing bad will happen within a two-block walk are pretty astronomical, and then add to that the VERY tiny chance that their parent will pursue legal action (these are parents that we, as a rule, work together with as partners- and we have very good relationships with our parents).

Here’s a corker. Our local Little League uses the fields on our school grounds for practice and games.¬† Can we release the kids to just walk across the field (again on the SAME physical grounds) to practice?¬† Heck no… we require a “responsible adult” to come and sign them out and walk them the 100 yards to practice).¬† And, even better, by policy that “responsible adult” cannot be one of our staff members (even if the parents say it’s okay and we walk them every step of the way).

Finally, here’s a spot where I’ve rebelled (although quietly). At one of our “sister centers” (on the grounds of another local school)… they had a kindergartner who fell off the monkey bars while playing in the afterschool program and broke her arm.¬† Immediately, and with almost scary domino-like action, many of the other local centers (including the one in question) banned kindergarteners from the play structures (even though they’re labeled for use by kids 5-12 years of age).¬† No one ever made it an official policy, so my kindergarteners continue to enjoy play time on the play structure.

My main philosophy in afterschool care is that we exist to facilitate the emotional and social growth of children.¬† And if we’re going to succumb to the bubble-wrap philosophy of raising kids, then our mission is doomed from the start! At my center, kids will be allowed to play freely on the play structure, kids will be allowed to wrestle in the grass, and I will make free range choices in every area where they have not already been banned and by the regulating agencies, lawyers and insurance adjusters.¬† And unlike some of my fellow co-workers, I will not succumb to the “worst-first” type of thinking that stunts the social and emotional growth of the next generation. – Rick Rood